Pricing for Website Design (Graphics Only)


Question

I was wondering if someone could advise me on pricing for a website design.

I'm redesigning a blog/travel site for an individual. The site is about 8 pages plus some modules, etc. I'm also redesigning their logo. I've already spent about a week doing it, maybe 3 hours per day and I'm still not halfway finished (kind of a perfectionist). I plan to charge for the project itself, rather than hourly. According to the advise I've already received, I should be charging anywhere between $1000 and $1500. I'm just curious what other people thought.

My main concern is overcharging for a site that I will not be coding. I am doing ONLY the graphics and basically the product I'm delivering with be a wireframe layout and all the custom graphic files (vectors, etc.) and the person I'm designing it for will do all the CMS stuff himself. Again, I'm doing NO CODING whatsoever.

So, that said, what should I be charging? I'm also including unlimited design revisions up to two months after initial completion. Any ideas? Another thing to mention is that I'm a student and it's my first paid job (but he doesn't know that). Anyway, thanks in advance for any suggestions you may have!

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3/9/2016 9:20:00 PM

1) Yes, your price range is fine. You have a lot of pages plus a logo. However...

2) Why don't you have a contract? The contract should spell out exactly what you are doing, exactly what the client is going to receive, who owns what copyrights, and exactly what you are charging, particularly if it's a per-project fee and not hourly.

3) DO NOT OFFER UNLIMITED REVISIONS EVER.

Not for a month, a week, a day, an hour. When you have a plumber come to your house to fix the toilet, does he say "I'll come back and tighten the washers in the sink and fix the leaky hose, for free, as long as you call back within a month"? Of course not. He charges for the work he does. More work is more pay. Don't ever give away your services for free, which is exactly what "unlimited revisions" means.

Being paid on retainer is different; that's a flat fee for a specific period of time, during which the client can give you as much or as little work as they like, but you are getting paid regardless.

You offer a specific number of rounds of revisions (I like three) in the contract. Rounds of revisions after that get paid for on an hourly basis. They can revise for years, but you're getting paid for your labor.

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7/26/2012 3:13:00 PM

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